The New York Police Department announced today that it has obtained 14 drones and plans to use them in policing efforts across New York City

Why NYPD needs 14 more drones to its growing fleet

NYPD has new 14 drones and plans to use them in policing efforts across New York City

The New York Police Department announced today that it has obtained 14 drones and plans to use them in policing efforts across New York City, in a move that has gathered backlash from civil advocacy groups that are worried about the department’s intentions.

In the statement, the NYPD stated that 29 officers are trained to utilize the unmanned aerial cars (UAVs). The drones are prepared to be used to police great occasions in the city, like concerts, and in hostage situations and criminal activity scene investigations. The department stated today that it doesn’t prepare to utilize the brand-new technology to implement traffic laws or surveil citizens.

29 OFFICERS ARE TRAINED TO USE THE UAVS.

Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill said in a declaration on Tuesday, “As the largest municipal authorities department in the United States, the NYPD should constantly be willing to leverage the advantages of new and always-improving innovation.”.

In spite of the declarations from the NYPD recommending that the devices won’t be used maliciously, local groups are voicing concern that they could be used in surveillance efforts. Drones have been carried out in other police departments across the country, and they have been met with the issue from local advocacy groups and residents. Groups like the New York City Civil Liberties Union are slamming the NYPD’s brand-new drone policy, saying that it doesn’t put any “significant restrictions” on the use of the drones, and it permits the department to produce a long-term archive of all of the gotten video footage.

” While we value the NYPD’s desire to meet us before it revealed this program,” the NYCLU stated in a declaration, “our company believes the brand-new policy falls far except what is required to stabilize the department’s genuine law-enforcement needs versus the privacy interests of New Yorkers.”.